Monday, March 29, 2010

Got What it Takes to be a Station Manager?




We wanted to know exactly what was in the job description for "station manager," so we asked. Here it is. Click on the images for legible versions.

Here are some highlights:
  • make announcements via the PA to assist public in use of the transit system
  • place fare collection in-service and out-of-service as equipment conditions/passenger loads dictate
  • responds to problems indicated by Automatic Fare Collection machine status
  • furnishing route information
  • speaking in a pleasant voice
  • ability of furnish information with utmost tact
  • ability to maintain constant alertness
  • ability to interact effectively with large numbers of people
  • proven ability to communicate effectively
  • demonstrate interest in and have a favorable attitude toward public service

Surprisingly, there's no mention of raccoon raising skills.

What's your impression? Are station managers fulfilling the job description?

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Other items:
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Who knew? Higher fares hit poor hardest (WaPo)

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

What does ATU local 689 say?

...because that's all that counts.

Kara said...

The ones that have the word 'ability' are meaningless to the question, as just because someone has an ability does not mean they use it. The rest are varied but most station managers are lousy with a few gems. My stop used to have one of the gems but he got transferred.

Anonymous said...

LOL - high school diploma or GED, with preferred college training in behavioral science??

"Hey, I started out mopping the floor just like you guys. But now... now I'm washing lettuce. Soon I'll be on fries; then the grill. And pretty soon, I'll make assistant manager, and that's when the big bucks start rolling in."

Anonymous said...

I honestly would do a great job as a station manager. Alas it doesn't seem like they're hiring managers or rail operators.

A.Smith said...

If I read a person's job description and am shocked at some of the things they're required to do... that's a bad sign...

Some of the things you might expect a station manager to do may come more from the nature of the job -- so you expect a person who interacts with the public to speak pleasantly, though you may not imagine it's a specific requirement...

Hm. Maybe some of the station managers don't know what's in the job description... (chuckle, chuckle).

Anonymous said...

"the nature of the job -- so you expect a person who interacts with the public to speak pleasantly, though you may not imagine it's a specific requirement..."
Gee, I've forgotten if the station manager was speaking pleasently when he refused to tell me his name or employee # to file a complaint.
I guess Metro really knows how to choose them, Not.
As one of the earlier comments said- a few jewels mixed in with a lot of BS.

Apa said...

Agreeing with Kara's comment. By and large, the station managers I've interacted with are either hostile/crabby or just blank. (You know the ones. The ones who give you a blank stare when you say your card's not working, take it from you, push some buttons, give it back to you and possibly wave you through, all without saying a word.) I know Metro Station Manager is not the most fun job in the world. But if you can't make an effort to behave like a human being then you need to find another job.

Jamie said...

Another job we poor colorblind folks can't do!

Anonymous said...

Not sure of his name, but the Eisenhower manager (who seems to be there mostly during morning rush and on Saturdays) ROCKS! He's friendly, helpful, and quick to correct people he catches doing stupid stuff (most frequently the tourists who have no idea what they're doing-EVER). He also often stands near the entrance doors to tell commuters how long they have until the next train will be in. There aren't enough compliments on this blog, and he is most deserving of one.

Anonymous said...

Not sure of his name, but the Eisenhower manager (who seems to be there mostly during morning rush and on Saturdays) ROCKS! He's friendly, helpful, and quick to correct people he catches doing stupid stuff (most frequently the tourists who have no idea what they're doing-EVER). He also often stands near the entrance doors to tell commuters how long they have until the next train will be in. There aren't enough compliments on this blog, and he is most deserving of one.

aious said...

I will admit that in the last few months, they seem to have improved.

Before then, it was like pulling a tooth to get them to help.

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