Tuesday, July 6, 2010

What Does it Take to be a WMATA Man?


The whole McGruff incident still makes us both laugh and cry. You couldn't make such a preposterous story up. It's even more unimaginable that Shawn Brim could get his job back!

We wanted to follow up with Metro about just exactly what it takes to become a WMATA man and how many people apply for open positions as bus drivers.

There's not exactly a dearth of applicants. Metro said they can receive up to 2,000 applications for one bus driver position. Turnover must be very high since they bring in 24 drivers every 6 weeks for an 8-week training course before they hit the streets.

According to Metro, Brim's "retraining" consisted of "everything he learned in the basic bus operator's course." Hope it sticks this time!

Here's a little more about what it takes to be a WMATA man from this current job posting:
This position is responsible for the safe and courteous operation of a public transit bus through assigned scheduled routes. The incumbent must adhere to all safety and traffic rules, regulations, policies, and procedures to ensure the well being of Metro customers, employees, self, and the general public. Additionally, an individual in this role provides schedule and fare information, collects fares, and ensures the safe boarding and alighting of all passengers. The individual in this role must demonstrate a professional, pleasant, courteous and helpful demeanor towards the public at all times and must be able to maintain composure in stressful situations.

Ability to deliver stellar customer service and communicate effectively and courteously even under adverse circumstances.
Graphic by Josh Frankel, a graphic/web designer in D.C. He can be reached for projects at http://badsushidesign.com/.

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6 comments:

Anonymous said...

That pic made my Monday LOL

Anonymous said...

Unsuck...I was out of town last week. Could you explain how someone is not struck by a train yet dies AND creates a disturbance so shocking that it completely severs the Red Line? Touching the third rail and being electrocuted is the only thing I can think of, but electrocution isn't necessarily that gruesome. This one has me baffled.

Kara said...

Makes you wonder what parts of the job description are rigid and what are fluff words.

Any part about customer service is fluff: we all know how they care about customer service.

Collect fares: semi-rigid, it depends if the fare box is working.

Provide information? Don't make me laugh.

So we are left with this:

"The incumbent must adhere to all safety and traffic rules, regulations, policies, and procedures to ensure the well being of Metro customers, employees, self, and the general public."

Maybe metro's stance is that the law itself is, in the words of Capt. Barbossa "more of a guideline than a rule"?


PS- I wonder about those 100 4000 series cars that are out of service, I suppose that means their 50 sandwiched 1000 series are cooling their wheels as well? Remember how long it took to get them in there, do we REALLY think metro took the time to remove them? While it is annoying for those of us working this week, it will be even worse next week when people return to a normal schedule. Metro estimates it will take 2-3 weeks (just like their escalator estimates I guess?) ... joy.

Anonymous said...

@Anon 8:12: As I understand it, the individual jumped from a mezzanine. That's a pretty fair fall onto hard tracks, and if, for example, he landed on his head...

Anonymous said...

@9:11 - Thanks. I hadn't heard that part. Makes more sense now.

Anonymous said...

@9:11 - Thanks. I hadn't heard that part. Makes more sense now.

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